When life gives you lemons, make them into brownies

It’s been some time my friends.  I hope anyone reading this is well, healthy and hanging in there.

I’ve been absent for a variety of reasons.  For one, while the working part of the working from home transition has been easy, it means I’ve lost my “client” base.  Baking really just isn’t as fun when I can’t share the spoils–and my creativity has suffered for it.

Speaking of work, it’s really all I’ve been doing.  I work for a university, and like lots of large, human-dense institutions, the pandemic has disrupted just about everything we do.  It’s exciting in a way–higher education evolves at a notoriously slow rate, so a catastrophic event is often the only excuse we have to enact change quickly.  The work has been interesting, I think eventually it will be useful and it’s empowering to be able to contribute during a time when helplessness is often the plat du jour (at least for me).

But, it’s been all-encompassing.

Even so, I had to stop by and share this recipe for lemon brownies.  It’s by Helen Goh, so I really don’t need to say any more.  Except, that, you need them in your life.  And, they’re simple enough in ingredients and technique that you can have them in your life over and over again.

These snack cakes are tart, sweet and on par in deliciousness with their fussier to make cousin, the lemon bar.  And unlike lemon bars, they travel really well should you need something to bring to your next socially distanced outing.

The original recipe calls for half a cup of berries.  I haven’t used them here, but if you have them, go for it! Lemons and blueberries or raspberries are good friends.

I have no idea how often TMHostess will be updated in the coming months.  I have several posts ready for the writing, just not the time (or motivation) to get them to “print.”  So, I’ll see you when I see you.  Stay well and safe.

Helen Goh’s Lemon Brownies

adapted slightly because I can’t help it and converted to include volumetric measurements

Ingredients

  •  1 2/3 C (200g) all purpose flour
  • ¼ tsp baking powder
  • ¼ tsp baking soda
  • ¼ tsp kosher salt
  • 1 C (250g) unsalted butter, cut into dice-sized pieces
  • 1  1/2 C (300g) granulated sugar
  • 1 tbsp lemon zest, chopped
  • 1/2 C (100ml) lemon juice (separate 2 TBS for icing)
  • 2 large eggs, lightly beaten
  • Optional: 1/2 C blueberries, raspberries or whatever fruit you like to pair with citrus
  • 1 C confectioner’s sugar

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees.  Line bottom of a 9X9 pan with parchment and grease.
  2. Whisk together flour, baking powder, soda and salt.  Set aside.
  3. In a small saucepan, melt butter on low heat.  Once butter is melted, gently stir-in sugar and lemon zest. Continue mixing (with heat on) until mixture is smooth, shiny and hot (about 2 minutes).
  4. Remove from heat and whisk-in lemon juice (minus 2 TBS) followed by the eggs (one at a time).
  5. Pour mixture into sifted dry ingredients.  Using a spatula, fold until just combined.
  6. Scrape batter into prepared pan.  Bake on middle shelf of oven for 35-40 minutes or until the edges begin to pull away from the pan and the top is golden brown.  Brownies are done when a wooden skewer inserted into the center comes out clean (or with a few crumbs).
  7. Remove from oven and allow to cool completely.
  8. Whisk together confectioner’s sugar and 2 TBS lemon.  Water can be added until you get desired consistency.  Using a fork, drizzle icing over brownies.
  9. These will keep in the fridge for at least a week.  You can serve them at room temp but we decided we like them chilled.

 

Weird, but in a good way?

I don’t know about you guys, but I haven’t been in a Grocery store since March 14th.  If my Instacart account is correct, we’re averaging groceries every 2 1/2 weeks or so.  And, the results have been mixed (Understandably. This is an observation, not a complaint.).

On the last order there was no fresh garlic or lemons.  But they did have the Pepperidge Farm Frozen Coconut Cake I threw in as a one-off to celebrate our anniversary.  By the way, it was delicious.  Seriously.  Who would have thought?

If your experiences have been similar, now is either a really good–or a really bad–time to post a recipe with an unusual ingredient.

Like, say miso (soybean paste).  When I saw this recipe in the New York Times Food section a while back, my weird, but good spidey sense began to blip.  The combination works really well in savory dishes.  Why not a cookie?

My tried and true critic liked them even when he didn’t know the secret ingredient.  Further beta-testing revealed a generally favorable opinion of these weird-but-in-a-good way treats.  And then the holy grail was discovered by one test subject…I mean friend: a scoop of vanilla ice cream.  Cold, creamy and rich, the ice cream is a perfect complement to the earthy, almost spicy flavors of peanut butter and miso.

Bonus these cookies make excellent ice cream sandwiches.

Peanut Butter Miso Cookies

Krysten Chambrot, as posted in the New York Times

Ingredients

  • 1 3/4 C (225g) all-purpose flour
  • 3/4 tsp baking soda
  • 1/2 tsp  baking powder
  • 1/2 C (115g) unsalted butter at room temp
  • 1 C (220g) light brown sugar
  • 1/3 C (80ml) white miso paste (you are right…I didn’t use white…it was fine)
  • 1/4 C (60 ml) chunky peanut butter
  • 1 large egg
  •  1 1/2 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1/2 C (105g) Demera sugar (or substitute granulated)

Directions

  1. In a medium bowl, whisk together flour, baking soda and baking powder until incorporated. Set aside.
  2. In standing mixer (or hand) fitted with paddle attachment, cream butter, light brown sugar and granulated sugar until light and fluffy, about five minutes.
  3. Add miso and peanut butter and continue to beat, about one minute.  Scrape down the sides of the bowl and mix for another minute.  Make sure everything is well-incorporated.  Add egg and vanilla, mix until just combined.
  4. Remove bowl from mixer and gently fold-in flour mixture 1/3 at a time.
  5. Place Demera (or granulated) sugar in a bowl.  Scoop-out 2 TBS dough, roll into a ball with hands and then roll in sugar.  Transfer to a parchment lined pan that will fit in your fridge.  Repeat with remainder of dough lining up balls into rows.  Refrigerate two-hours to over night.  I suggest over night…it will optimally mellow out the flavors.
  6. When ready to bake, preheat oven to 350 degrees.  Place cookie balls on sheets leaving about three-inches in-between (these will spread).  Bake for about 15 minutes, until crisp at the edges and slightly puffy in the middle.  When you pull them out, rap the baking pan on the counter to help further-flatten the cookies.  Let cool on sheets for a few minutes and the transfer to rack to cool completely.

No AP? No Problem! Oatmeal Cookies

First things first–are ya’ll picking up on some of the amazing daily or weekly live Instagrams from some remarkable chefs?  I’m sure there are a ton out there, but a couple of my favorites are Christina Tosi’s Baking Club and David Lebovitz’s L’Huere d’Apero (cocktail hour).  Follow each of them on Instagram to play along at home.

On to this week’s post.

No TP and No AP?  All I can think is that people are all over the country are doing some kind of bizarre papier mache project.  I mean seriously.

As a practice, I don’t keep a huge supply of AP flour on hand.  It isn’t super duper shelf-stable and it takes up a lot of space.  I generally like to freeze my specialty flours to help keep them fresh, but AP I just buy as I go.  And that’s why I only have 10 lbs on hand (sounds like a lot…it’s only two small bags) (also, I had this before we went on lock down so it isn’t like I’ve been able to find any either).

While I’m not hoarding AP, I am rationing it.

You know what I do have?  A giant container of old fashioned oats.  So I set about finding a cookie recipe that uses only oats.  My strategy was two-fold.  The first is obvious: save the AP (save the AP save the world?).  The second is that I wanted to have a treat around that I wouldn’t eat.  Oatmeal cookies aren’t my favorite, but TD likes them.

I like this recipe because it calls for making oat flour in addition to using whole oats (whole oats need a binder like peanut butter or flour or egg to help keep it all together…kind of like me).  Since hauling out the food processor can be a chore, I made three times the amount and stored the leftovers in a freezer bag in the fridge for next time.

The oatmeal base is a great tableau for any add-ins you have on  hand.  The cookies themselves aren’t too sweet so you can get crazy with the goodies.  I used chocolate chips and dried tart cherries (per TD request…and because I didn’t have any raisins), but I think they’d be great with coconut, pretzels, M&Ms, other kinds of chocolate chips–whatever sounds good.

No AP Oatmeal Cookies

Adapted slightly from Trevor and Jennifer at Show Me the Yummy

Ingredients

  • 1 1/4 C ground old fashioned oats (2 C old fashioned oats ground in food processor)
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/4 tsp nutmeg (if this is your thing…omit if not)
  •  1/2 tsp baking soda
  • 1/2 tsp kosher or coarse sea salt
  • 1/2 C (4 ounces) unsalted butter at room temp
  • 3/4 C dark or golden brown sugar
  • 1/2 TBS vanilla extract
  • 1 large egg, room temp
  • 1 1/2 C old fashioned oats
  • 1/2 C chocolate chips
  • 1/2 C your choice dried fruits, nuts or other add-ins

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees and line baking sheets with parchment (I got 26 cookies out of this using a 2 TBS scooper that I divided between 4 sheets).
  2. In a medium bowl, whisk together ground oats, salt, cinnamon, nutmeg (if using) and baking soda.  Set aside.
  3. Using a stand or hand mixer, cream butter and brown sugar until light and fluffy (2-3 minutes).
  4. Beat-in egg and vanilla, another 2 minutes.
  5. By hand, fold-in ground oat mixture.
  6. Gently fold-in whole oats, chocolate chips and other add-ins.
  7. Portion-out dough (I used a 2 TBS scoop).  Cookies will spread so accommodate for size when placing on cookie sheets.
  8. Bake for 10-15 minutes depending on dough size, rotating sheets halfway through.
  9. Remove from oven and allow cookies to sit for at least 5-10 minutes.  Allow to cool completely on wire rack.

 

Grown Up Chocolate Chip Cookies

I hope everyone is hanging in there.  Given that this blog is called the Misanthropic Hostess, you can probably tell how I’m doing.

People keep asking me if I’m doing lots of baking and are surprised to hear that I’m not.  Like most (I hope) people, I’m sequestered at home and adjusting to a for-now normal.  For me, a big part of this is establishing a consistent and doable day job schedule.

For me, baking isn’t work (I’m not saying people shouldn’t bake or do whatever they can to get through these days–I just personally don’t want to confuse work and baking modes).  So, I’ll be sticking to doing my baking on the weekends.  Something to look forward to.

In the weeks before social distancing, I baked all of the sweet stuff that was in my freezers to make room for more sensible things like frozen ground turkey and a few trays of a dish TD and I call Shizzyladas.  Giving away the baked goods was fun as always.  But, I made very fatal error on my part: I forgot to hold anything back for me and TD.

So, last weekend, I made up a batch of dough for one of the few cookies TD and I agree on: Chocolate Chip. These are a little fancier than the norm with browned butter, a bit of rye flour and lots and lots and lots of chocolate.  Really, get creative with the chocolate.  The great thing about these is that you can make the dough, portion it, chill it and freeze it for on-the-spot baking.

Early returns show that I’m going to have to limit the number of baked cookies available to my housemates and I.

Grown Up Chocolate Chip Cookies

NYT/Toll House/Yo’ Momma Inspired

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 C cake flour
  • 3/4 C rye flour
  • 1 1/2 C bread flour
  • 1 1/2 tsp baking soda
  • 1 1/2 tsp baking powder
  • 1 1/2 tsp kosher salt
  • 2 1/2 sticks (1 1/4 C) unsalted butter at room temp [note--brown the butter if you want to get super adult–if browning, use 3 sticks]
  • 1 1/4 C light brown sugar
  • 1 1/4 C granulated sugar
  • 1 large egg plus 1 egg yolk
  • 2 tsp vanilla extract
  • 20 ounces (about  3 1/4 cups) dark chocolate disks (you could use any combination of chocolate here.  In the cookies pictured I happened to have 6 ounces of solid 72% chocolate that I chopped and combined with 12 ounces of discs).

Instructions

  1. In a medium bowl, sift together flours, baking powder,  soda and salt.  Set aside.
  2. In the bowl of a stand mixer, cream butter until fluffy (if using brown butter, it may only fluff a bit).  Add in sugars and cream until light, 3-4 minutes.
  3. Add in egg, egg yolk and vanilla beating in between each to combine.
  4. Stop mixer and add dry ingredients.  Mix on lowest speed until just combined.  Fold-in your chocolate.
  5. Scoop dough into desired sized balls.  While 1/4 C is a popular size and will give you amazing bakery-sized cookies, I like to use a 2 TBS scoop.
  6. Refrigerate balls for at least 24 hours (or do as I do and refrigerate until cold and then freeze double bagged until you want to use them).
  7. When ready to bake, preheat oven to 350 degrees.  Line your sheets with parchment.  Allow a couple of inches in between smaller dough balls and up to four if you are really going for it with the 1/4 C scoop.
  8. Bake until golden (this is about 11 minutes in my oven from very cold, 13 if frozen).

Chinese Style Almond Cookies

You know the ones.  Crumbly and shortbread-like in texture, satisfyingly rich with  just a hint of almond.

When I first thought I’d try making these, I disappeared down the rabbit whole of origin.  While some sources say they are an adaption of the Chinese walnut cookie, these simple sweet biscuits have an uncertain background.

I reviewed several recipes and decided to dive in with the cookie from Elaine at China Sichuan Food because of the addition of almond flour.   Beware, even a small amount of time spent on her site will make you very, very hungry.

Like most things made from scratch, these were much better than anything I’d ever had from the package.  In fact, found myself returning and trying them several times just to make sure.

Chinese Style Almond Cookies

from www.chinasichuanfood.com

Ingredients

  • 1 1/4 C (120g) cake flour
  • 2/3 C (60g) almond flour
  • pinch of kosher salt
  • 1/2 tsp baking soda
  • 1/2 C (115 g) butter softened
  • 1/4 C minus 1 TBS (40g) granulated sugar
  • 1 egg yolk
  • 1/4 tsp almond extract
  • 16 whole almonds

for egg wash

  • 1 egg plus 1 TBS water lightly beaten

Directions

  1. Sift together the flours, baking soda and salt in a bowl, set aside.
  2. Cream butter and sugar until light, a couple of minutes.  Beat-in the egg yolk and extract.
  3. Add dry ingredient to wet ingredients on low speed until just combined.
  4. On a clean surface, gently kneed the dough into a ball, wrap in plastic and refrigerate for an hour.
  5. Preheat oven to 325 degrees.  Line baking sheets with parchment.
  6. Divide dough into 16 equally-sized pieces.  Roll each into a ball.  Slightly flatten with finger or criss-cross with a fork.  Add whole almond to center and brush with egg wash.
  7. Bake for 18-20 minutes.  Allow to cool completely on pans.

 

Basic B Oatmeal Cookies

Snicky snackys are my downfall.  Pub mix. Cheez-Its. Chex mix.  Trail mix (though the fact that nuts aren’t my favorite save me a little here).  I love it all.

This is why I never have them in our house.  It’s also why I know better than to go to Target on a busy Saturday afternoon when I’m hungry.

But, I did and I was and so a Handful of Everything  trail mix ended up in my cart.

There I was, trying not to lose my mind in our local “newly redesigned” Target (which is code for they want to sell more stuff so they’ve narrowed each aisle just enough that the carts can’t pass one another achieving what is effectively a very subtle but no less psychologically hostile Thunderdome).  While I had a list, I didn’t completely know my way around the new layout and so accidentally ended up in the snicky snaky aisle.  Oops.

I spied the Handful of Everything trail mix and suddenly Meredith Brooks was belting out “I don’t envy you, I’m a little bit of everything, All rolled into one, I’m a bitch, I’m a lover, I’m a child, I’m a mother…”

This happens to me all the time, Allie McBeal style.  I’m not kidding.

So, in order to not eat the entire container, I made cookies and the Basic B cookie was born.  Because we all know, there is no such thing as a Basic B.

You get it right?  I’m using it ironically, hipster style.  Please don’t call anyone a Basic B.

Basic B Oatmeal Cookies

inspired by a basic recipe from All Recipes

Ingredients

  • 3 C all-purpose flour
  • 1 TBS baking powder
  • 1 TBS baking soda
  • 1 TBS ground cinnamon
  • 1 tsp kosher salt
  • 1 1/2 C, 3/4 pound/ 1 sticks unsalted butter, softened
  • 1 1/2 C granulated sugar
  • 1 1/2 C packed golden brown sugar
  • 3 eggs, room temp
  • 1 TBS vanilla
  • 3 C old fashioned rolled oats (not quick cooking/ 1 minute)
  • 7 C assorted goodies. I used all but about an ounce of the 27 ounce container of Archer Farms Handful of Everything trail mix.  If you go for the trail mix, chop mango and break-up banana chip pieces. Could could also use any combination of chocolate chips, coconut, dried fruit, nuts, M&Ms etc.

Directions

  1. In a medium bowl, sift together flour, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon and salt.  Set aside.
  2. In bowl of a larger stand mixer or large bowl with a hand mixer, cream butter until smooth and creamy, about 3 minutes.  Gradually beat-in both sugars.  Cream another 3-4 minutes.
  3. Beat-in eggs one-at-a-time, beating in between.  Beat in vanilla.
  4. Fold-in flour mixture until just combined.
  5. Fold in your goodies.
  6. Depending on the size of cookie you want, roll 1/4 scoops (bigger) into balls or, my preference, 2 TBS scoops (smaller).  Roll all dough and allow to rest in the fridge for a couple of hours to over night.  Once very cold, these will also freeze well to be baked-off at a later time.
  7. When ready to bake, preheat oven to 350 degrees.  Line cookie sheets with parchment.
  8. For large cookies, bake 15-17 minutes (10-11 for smaller) until the edges are lightly browned.  Don’t forget to rotate pans halfway through.
  9. Allow to cool completely before picking up.

Honey, please do!

These are a take on the honey cake often served at Rosh Hashanah.  I am cognizant that from a timing perspective, I’m off by not just the Rosh Hashanah holiday, but also the Western calendar and the Lunar New Year.  Since I’ve missed a hat trick of New Years and the fiscal new year is still a couple quarters off, how about we celebrate the start of February?

Speaking of new years and February, I had a little bit of a revelation this early 2020.  Each year I ride the struggle bus through January.    It’s dark, I’m tired from the holidays and generally not in a ‘let’s get this party started’ mood come January 1st through, well, let’s be honest, 20th.  I’m tired of beating myself up over it.  So, going forward, I’m declaring January as the transition month to the new year.  I’ve decided it’s just fine to spend the first couple of weeks focused on putting one foot in front of the next as I shake off the holiday indulgence and stress.  I’ve also decided it’s great to gently nudge and nurture my ideas for goals on the next trip around the sun rather attempting to do it in the hectic lead up to the first day of the year.

So my friends, happy new year.

The apple butter (or apple sauce) helps to keep these moist. And, the spice profile is just sassy enough to make things interesting.

I’ve made muffins for this post but also give the bundt instructions below.  These would be really nice served for a new year’s (you pick) brunch to be topped with additional apple butter, cream cheese or maybe just a little good butter.

Honey Cake Muffins

Cooks Illustrated

Ingredients

  • 2 1/2 C (12 1/2 ounces) all-purpose flour
  • 1 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 1/2 tsp baking soda
  • 4 large eggs
  • 1/2 C water
  • 6 TBS unsweetened apple sauce or apple butter
  • 1/4 C (2 ounces) vegetable oil (I used grape seed)
  • 1/4 C ( 2 ounces) orange juice
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1 3/4 C (20 ounces) honey
  • 1/2 C Trader Joes honey almonds (optional).

Directions

  1. Adjust oven rack to middle position and preheat oven to 325 degrees.  If making muffins, line 24 cups with liners (I got 23 muffins from this recipe–you could squeeze to 24 I think).  If making a cake, heavily spray a 12-cup non-stick Bundt pan with baking spray, then flour or, get some Bak Clean–it’s worth the sticker shock.
  2. Whisk together flour, salt, baking powder and baking soda in a large bowl.
  3. In a separate bowl, whisk eggs, water, applesauce or apple butter, oil, orange juice and vanilla.
  4. Whisk wet mixture into dry mixture until fully incorporated.
  5. Evenly portion  batter into cups or pour batter into Bundt pan. Top with slivered almonds if desired.
  6. For muffins, bake 20-25 minutes until a skewer inserted into the middle of a muffin comes out clean.  Bake 45-60 minutes if doing Bundt.
  7. Let cool in tins for 10 muffins, then gently remove and allow to cool completely on rack.

LAUSD Coffee Cake

Right out of graduate school I went to work for a non-profit educational consulting firm.  Over the four years I worked there, I spent a lot of time in LAUSD schools.

I spent hours doing classroom observations, attending staff meetings, interviewing faculty and staff and even waiting outside of the principal’s office.   I also spent time in the cafeterias (in Southern California, this is where kids go when it’s recess and raining).  Yet somehow in all that time, I missed the Angelino institution known as LAUSD coffee cake.

I know, I know.  Public school cafeterias aren’t exactly known for their cuisine.  But this is the stuff of school yard legend.  I came across it in a blurb on some social media platform or another which resulted in a quick Google dive.  Turns out, this snack cake has been famous for a very, very long time.  In fact, the recipe I found came from a 1994 (!) Los Angeles Times article.

The cake is deceptively simple, with a surprise secret ingredient: nutmeg.  If you are looking for something quick to put together for a holiday brunch or gifts for friends or family (it travels very well), consider this recipe LAUSD’s holiday gift to you.

LAUSD Coffee Cake

as printed in the Los Angeles Times, January 27, 1994

Ingredients

  • 2 1/2 C all purpose flour
  • 1 C brown sugar
  • 1 C granulated sugar
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp nutmeg
  • 3/4 C grapeseed oil
  • 2 tsp cinnamon
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 1 egg
  • 1 C buttermilk at room temp

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees.  Line a 9X13 inch pan with parchment.
  2. Whisk together flour, brown sugar, granulated sugar, salt, nutmeg and oil.
  3. Remove 1/2 C of mixture from bowl.  Add 1 tsp cinnamon and set aside for topping.
  4. Combine remaining 1 tsp cinnamon, baking soda, egg and buttermilk.  Blend well.  Fold into flour mixture, do not over mix.
  5. Spoon batter into prepared pan.  Sprinkle with 1/2 C reserved topping.
  6. Bake for 30-40 minutes or until an inserted toothpick comes up clean.
  7. Allow to cool completely before cutting into squares.

If you’d like to ice as pictured

  • 1 C confectioner’s sugar
  • 1/4 water (or to desired consistency
  • Once cake is cooled, combine confectioner’s sugar and water in a small bowl.  Mix until you have your desired consistency.  Drizzle over top of cake.  Allow to harden before cutting.

Holiday Baking 2019 Recipes

And just like that, the 2019 holiday baking odyssey has come to an end.  As always, it was a hoot and even though in the 11th hour I swore I’d never do it again, I’m already dreaming about what to do for next year.

If you followed along with the 2019 Holiday Baking Analytics, you already know the stats.  I used nearly 80 pounds of sugar, 36 pounds of flour, 29 pounds of butter and 45 pounds of fruits, nuts and other add-ins.  I made nine types of cookies this year yielding 3,761 units.  We mailed 22 boxes and delivered another 30 or so in person.  Folks, my work here is done.

But, just in case you’d like to make your own, I’ve included links to each of the recipes below.

Cheers and happy holidays to all!

Sugar Stars

Rum Butter Nuts

Peanut Butter Balls

or as we call them in our house, Schweddy Balls

Triple Gingersnaps

Candied Orange Peel

Almond Butter Crunch

Confettidoodles

Brown Butter Coconut Caramel Crispies

Chocolate Crinkles

Our house looked like a tornado hit it for a day or two.

There was no theme, but I did have a lot of fun with colored duct tape (seriously–get some, it’s a good time).

And a new company for labels, Paper Culture.

I promised we stuffed as much as we could into each box.

Pre-purchasing labels from USPS is the way to go.

As an added bonus, each and every box (and most of the tissue paper) was checked for safety and construction by our quality control crew.

 

Ye Old Chocolate Crinkles

Traditional chocolate crinkle cookies were the second freshman cookie this year.  I wanted something simple and chocolatey to replace the World Peace cookies that have been in rotation for many years.  After searching through what seemed like hundreds of chocolate cookie recipes, the road lead me to this holiday favorite.

As I researched across recipes for the optimal chocolate crinkle, I learned that like rugelach, there really is only one recipe with slight variations.  Nearly all I saw use vegetable oil instead of butter and unsweetened cocoa instead of chocolate.

Again, never to leave well enough alone, my version has the subtle addition of espresso powder.  Because, as I’ve said before, why be normal.

Chocolate Crinkles

Ingredients

  • 1 C (90 grams) unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 1 1/2 C (325 grams) granulated sugar
  • 1/2 C vegetable oil (I like grapeseed)
  • 4 eggs at room temp
  • 2 tsp vanilla extract
  • 2 C (300 grams) all purpose flour
  • 2 tsp baking powder
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1 TBS espresso powder (optional)
  • 1/2 C confectioners/powdered sugar

Directions

  1. In a medium bowl, mix together cocoa, white sugar, and vegetable oil.
  2. Beat in eggs one at a time, then stir in the vanilla.
  3. Whisk together the flour, baking powder, espresso powder and salt; stir into the cocoa mixture.
  4. Cover dough, and chill for at least 4 hours.
  5. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).
  6. Line cookie sheets with parchment paper.
  7. Roll dough into one inch balls.
  8. Coat each ball in confectioners’ sugar before placing onto prepared cookie sheets.
  9. Bake in preheated oven for 10 to 12 minutes. Let stand on the cookie sheet for a minute before transferring to wire racks to cool.