Pan Thumped Snickerdoodles

There are times when I think I’ve done, baked, eaten and shared every cookie there is.

Luckily, each time my ego begins to slip in this direction, I stand corrected by something new and innovative that someone other than me thought up.

Case in point: pan thumping (and now you too will have the 1997  one hit wonder genius, Tub Thumping in your head).

Pan thumping’s (well, actually, banging…I just wanted you to join me in my Chumbawumba misery) mistress, Sarah Kieffer gives the fully skinny on the technique in her new book: 100 cookies: The baking book for every kitchen.  Arthur of the popular blog, The Vanilla Bean Blog, she discovered the ripply-edge effect of picking up and (gently) banging the edge of the pan of cookies starting at the half-baked mark while on a quest to find the ultimate chocolate chip cookie.

It’s a little like cookie dough whack-a-mole.  About halfway through the bake, you go in for the first bang, allow the cookies to puff up and then repeat at two (or so) minute intervals until your cookies are to desired doneness.  The result is a crispy ripply edge and chewy center.

Ms. Kieffer’s original pan banging recipe was for chocolate chip cookies.  I haven’t tried that recipe yet, but did jump right in with the snickerdoodle version.  Because it’s fall.  And cinnamon = fall.

The verdict: delicious and gorgeous.  The pan banging takes a little more attention (and time–you have to bake them one pan at a time), but the results were thin, crispy and chewy.  Basically snickerdoodle nirvana.

I did make one slight adjustment to the recipe, that I’d recommend if you already have the ingredient on hand.  Right before these cookies, I made a couple of my favorite chocolate cakes, Lori’s Chocolate Midnight Cake and used up the last of my vanilla.  Not willing to stop my baking process to run to the store, I subbed in a reduced amount of almond extract.  If you have some, try it out.  The difference is subtle but enough to make them a little unique.

And, just in case it’s still not stuck in your head.  I’ll leave this here:

(Pan Banged) Snickerdoodles

adapted just slightly from Sarah Kieffer

Ingredients

  • 2 C (184g) all-purpose flour
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 3/4 tsp salt
  • 1/2 tsp cream of tartar
  • 1/4 tsp freshly grated nutmeg
  • 1 C (227 g) unsalted butter at room temp
  • 1 3/4 C (350g) granulated sugar, separated
  • 1 large egg, room temp
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract (or 1/2 tsp almond extract)
  • 1 TBS ground cinnamon

Directions

  1. Adjust oven rack to center and pre-heat to 350 degrees.  Line three sheet pans with parchment (or aluminum foil, dull-side up).
  2. In a small bowl, whisk together flour, baking soda, salt, cream of tartar and nutmeg.
  3. In the bowl of stand mixer fitted with a paddle, beat butter on medium until creamy (about 1 minuye).  Add 1 1/2 C  (300g) of the sugar and beat until very light, 2-3 minutes.  Add the egg and vanilla (or almond extract) and mix on low to combine.  Add the flour mixture and mix on low until just combined.
  4. In a small bowl, stir together remaining sugar and cinnamon.
  5. For the dough into balls.  The original recipe calls for 3 oz balls.  I prefer a smaller cookie and used a 1 ounce scoop.  Roll each dough ball in the cinnamon-sugar mixture.
  6. Place on pan an equal distance apart (if 3 oz balls, you’ll fit about 4 on half-sheet pan.  Twice that if using 1 oz scooper).
  7. Bake the cookies one pan at a time.  Bake until the dough balls have flattened but are puffed slightly,  8 minutes (closer to 7 in my own oven).  Life one side of the sheet pan up about 4 inches and gently let it drop against the oven rack.  After the cookies puff up again, repeat.  Repeat a few more times, baking 14-15 minutes total, until the edges are golden brown but the centers are still lightish.
  8. Transfer pan to a wire rack and let the cookies cool for 10 minutes.  After this, move to rack (no pan) to cool completely.

Weird, but in a good way?

I don’t know about you guys, but I haven’t been in a Grocery store since March 14th.  If my Instacart account is correct, we’re averaging groceries every 2 1/2 weeks or so.  And, the results have been mixed (Understandably. This is an observation, not a complaint.).

On the last order there was no fresh garlic or lemons.  But they did have the Pepperidge Farm Frozen Coconut Cake I threw in as a one-off to celebrate our anniversary.  By the way, it was delicious.  Seriously.  Who would have thought?

If your experiences have been similar, now is either a really good–or a really bad–time to post a recipe with an unusual ingredient.

Like, say miso (soybean paste).  When I saw this recipe in the New York Times Food section a while back, my weird, but good spidey sense began to blip.  The combination works really well in savory dishes.  Why not a cookie?

My tried and true critic liked them even when he didn’t know the secret ingredient.  Further beta-testing revealed a generally favorable opinion of these weird-but-in-a-good way treats.  And then the holy grail was discovered by one test subject…I mean friend: a scoop of vanilla ice cream.  Cold, creamy and rich, the ice cream is a perfect complement to the earthy, almost spicy flavors of peanut butter and miso.

Bonus these cookies make excellent ice cream sandwiches.

Peanut Butter Miso Cookies

Krysten Chambrot, as posted in the New York Times

Ingredients

  • 1 3/4 C (225g) all-purpose flour
  • 3/4 tsp baking soda
  • 1/2 tsp  baking powder
  • 1/2 C (115g) unsalted butter at room temp
  • 1 C (220g) light brown sugar
  • 1/3 C (80ml) white miso paste (you are right…I didn’t use white…it was fine)
  • 1/4 C (60 ml) chunky peanut butter
  • 1 large egg
  •  1 1/2 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1/2 C (105g) Demera sugar (or substitute granulated)

Directions

  1. In a medium bowl, whisk together flour, baking soda and baking powder until incorporated. Set aside.
  2. In standing mixer (or hand) fitted with paddle attachment, cream butter, light brown sugar and granulated sugar until light and fluffy, about five minutes.
  3. Add miso and peanut butter and continue to beat, about one minute.  Scrape down the sides of the bowl and mix for another minute.  Make sure everything is well-incorporated.  Add egg and vanilla, mix until just combined.
  4. Remove bowl from mixer and gently fold-in flour mixture 1/3 at a time.
  5. Place Demera (or granulated) sugar in a bowl.  Scoop-out 2 TBS dough, roll into a ball with hands and then roll in sugar.  Transfer to a parchment lined pan that will fit in your fridge.  Repeat with remainder of dough lining up balls into rows.  Refrigerate two-hours to over night.  I suggest over night…it will optimally mellow out the flavors.
  6. When ready to bake, preheat oven to 350 degrees.  Place cookie balls on sheets leaving about three-inches in-between (these will spread).  Bake for about 15 minutes, until crisp at the edges and slightly puffy in the middle.  When you pull them out, rap the baking pan on the counter to help further-flatten the cookies.  Let cool on sheets for a few minutes and the transfer to rack to cool completely.

Basic B Oatmeal Cookies

Snicky snackys are my downfall.  Pub mix. Cheez-Its. Chex mix.  Trail mix (though the fact that nuts aren’t my favorite save me a little here).  I love it all.

This is why I never have them in our house.  It’s also why I know better than to go to Target on a busy Saturday afternoon when I’m hungry.

But, I did and I was and so a Handful of Everything  trail mix ended up in my cart.

There I was, trying not to lose my mind in our local “newly redesigned” Target (which is code for they want to sell more stuff so they’ve narrowed each aisle just enough that the carts can’t pass one another achieving what is effectively a very subtle but no less psychologically hostile Thunderdome).  While I had a list, I didn’t completely know my way around the new layout and so accidentally ended up in the snicky snaky aisle.  Oops.

I spied the Handful of Everything trail mix and suddenly Meredith Brooks was belting out “I don’t envy you, I’m a little bit of everything, All rolled into one, I’m a bitch, I’m a lover, I’m a child, I’m a mother…”

This happens to me all the time, Allie McBeal style.  I’m not kidding.

So, in order to not eat the entire container, I made cookies and the Basic B cookie was born.  Because we all know, there is no such thing as a Basic B.

You get it right?  I’m using it ironically, hipster style.  Please don’t call anyone a Basic B.

Basic B Oatmeal Cookies

inspired by a basic recipe from All Recipes

Ingredients

  • 3 C all-purpose flour
  • 1 TBS baking powder
  • 1 TBS baking soda
  • 1 TBS ground cinnamon
  • 1 tsp kosher salt
  • 1 1/2 C, 3/4 pound/ 1 sticks unsalted butter, softened
  • 1 1/2 C granulated sugar
  • 1 1/2 C packed golden brown sugar
  • 3 eggs, room temp
  • 1 TBS vanilla
  • 3 C old fashioned rolled oats (not quick cooking/ 1 minute)
  • 7 C assorted goodies. I used all but about an ounce of the 27 ounce container of Archer Farms Handful of Everything trail mix.  If you go for the trail mix, chop mango and break-up banana chip pieces. Could could also use any combination of chocolate chips, coconut, dried fruit, nuts, M&Ms etc.

Directions

  1. In a medium bowl, sift together flour, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon and salt.  Set aside.
  2. In bowl of a larger stand mixer or large bowl with a hand mixer, cream butter until smooth and creamy, about 3 minutes.  Gradually beat-in both sugars.  Cream another 3-4 minutes.
  3. Beat-in eggs one-at-a-time, beating in between.  Beat in vanilla.
  4. Fold-in flour mixture until just combined.
  5. Fold in your goodies.
  6. Depending on the size of cookie you want, roll 1/4 scoops (bigger) into balls or, my preference, 2 TBS scoops (smaller).  Roll all dough and allow to rest in the fridge for a couple of hours to over night.  Once very cold, these will also freeze well to be baked-off at a later time.
  7. When ready to bake, preheat oven to 350 degrees.  Line cookie sheets with parchment.
  8. For large cookies, bake 15-17 minutes (10-11 for smaller) until the edges are lightly browned.  Don’t forget to rotate pans halfway through.
  9. Allow to cool completely before picking up.

Ye Old Chocolate Crinkles

Traditional chocolate crinkle cookies were the second freshman cookie this year.  I wanted something simple and chocolatey to replace the World Peace cookies that have been in rotation for many years.  After searching through what seemed like hundreds of chocolate cookie recipes, the road lead me to this holiday favorite.

As I researched across recipes for the optimal chocolate crinkle, I learned that like rugelach, there really is only one recipe with slight variations.  Nearly all I saw use vegetable oil instead of butter and unsweetened cocoa instead of chocolate.

Again, never to leave well enough alone, my version has the subtle addition of espresso powder.  Because, as I’ve said before, why be normal.

Chocolate Crinkles

Ingredients

  • 1 C (90 grams) unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 1 1/2 C (325 grams) granulated sugar
  • 1/2 C vegetable oil (I like grapeseed)
  • 4 eggs at room temp
  • 2 tsp vanilla extract
  • 2 C (300 grams) all purpose flour
  • 2 tsp baking powder
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1 TBS espresso powder (optional)
  • 1/2 C confectioners/powdered sugar

Directions

  1. In a medium bowl, mix together cocoa, white sugar, and vegetable oil.
  2. Beat in eggs one at a time, then stir in the vanilla.
  3. Whisk together the flour, baking powder, espresso powder and salt; stir into the cocoa mixture.
  4. Cover dough, and chill for at least 4 hours.
  5. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).
  6. Line cookie sheets with parchment paper.
  7. Roll dough into one inch balls.
  8. Coat each ball in confectioners’ sugar before placing onto prepared cookie sheets.
  9. Bake in preheated oven for 10 to 12 minutes. Let stand on the cookie sheet for a minute before transferring to wire racks to cool.

Sables Bretons

Butter is my favorite food.  Not kidding.

I don’t think I’ve ever actually eaten it on its own (though I’ve been tempted); but it does make just about anything better.  Especially butter cookies. Especially, especially French butter cookies.

I made my first batch of sables Breton years and year ago after TD and I returned from France.  Brittany the region in the Northwest corner of the country, is famous for its high fat, ultra rich butter.  Enough years have passed since that trip that I am no longer embarrassed by how many of these cookies I ate while there.  These French biscuits are everything I want in a cookie: simple, just barely sweet and sandy in texture.

The sandy element is incredibly important: sable is French for sand.  And, made possible by the letter B for butter.  The first recipe I used was from Martha Stewart.  I made that recipe several times and then drifted away over the years.  As one does.

When I came across David Lebovitz’s recipe, I was reminded of our early fall trip to Bayeux and immediately pulled the butter from the freezer.

These cookies are known for the deep criss-cross pattern on the tops.  I made this batch over the course of a weekend and chilled them after cutting them into circles but before adding the cross hatching.  Cold butter doesn’t make for easy criss crosses and I did not press hard enough.  Do as I say, not as I do.

While butter is the front and center flavor in this cookie, the salt is equally important, so use the good stuff.

The uniformity in shape of these crumbly cookies make them lovely as gifts packaged up in a clear bag with some red and blue ribbon (think Bastille Day or Fourth of July).

Sables Bretons

by David Lebovitz (adapted just slightly by TMH)

Ingredients

  • 2/3 C (5.2 ounces, 150g) high quality high fat butter at room temp (I like Plugra but for best results, David Lebovitz recommends a cultured butter)
  • 2 tsps flaky sea salt
  • 4 large egg yolks
  • 1 C (200g) sugar
  • 1 3/4 C (210g) all-purpose flour
  • 4 tsp aluminum-free baking powder
  • 1 egg
  • 1 tsp water

Directions

  1. In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, cream the butter and salt together on low speed until smooth (about 30 seconds).
  2. In a separate bowl, whisk the egg yolks, gradually adding the sugar while whisking until the yolks are light and fluffy–about a minute.  With the mixer on low, add the egg yolk mixture to the butter, stopping the mixer to scrape down any butter clinging to the sides.  Mix until everything is incorporated.
  3. Sift together the flour and baking powder in a separate bowl.  Stir into creamed butter mixture until it’s just, but completely, incorporated.
  4. Pat the dough into a rectangle about 1-inh thick.  Wrap in plastic and chill for an hour (dough can be made up to five days in advance and stored in the fridge).
  5. Line baking sheet with parchment. Cut the rectangle of chilled dough in half and place the first half between two pieces of parchment.  Roll out the dough to about 1/3 inch thickness.  Using a 2-3 inch cookie cutter, cut out circles of dough.  Place them on the prepared baking sheet.  Set aside scraps and repeat with second half of dough.  Once you have completed the first layer of cut-out circles, top with two sheet of parchment and start with the second. Top circles with another piece of parchment and into the fridge for another 15 minutes.
  6. Gather your scraps.  Roll again between pieces of parchment.  If dough is still cold enough, cut out more circles.  If not, pop in fridge until cold.  Repeat process until all dough is used.
  7. Preheat over to 350 degrees.  Adjust oven rack to middle of the oven. Line baking sheets with parchment.  You want to bake-off cookies one sheet at-a-time.
  8. Beat an egg with 1 tsp water.  Place first round of dough circle on pan leaving a couple of inches in between each.  Brush the tops of the cookies with the egg wash then use a fork to cross hatch a pattern on the top of the cookies.
  9. Bake the cookies until the tops are golden brown, rotating baking sheets halfway through, about 15 minutes.  Cool on wire rack.
  10. Repeat with dough until all cookies are baked.

 

Paprika Peanut Butter Cookies

Move over chocolate, peanut butter has a new love interest and her name is smoked paprika.

You read that right.  Paprika.

When you think about it, pairing peanut butter with earthy, slightly spicy paprika makes a whole lot of sense.  Think of how much better peanut butter is on toast than just plain bread (toasty and smoky are similar…just go with it).  Now, add a little heat.  And to that, think of the sandy, crumbly texture of a perfect peanut butter cookie.  You picking up what I’m putting down here?

This recipe incorporates smoked paprika is both the dough and on top.

The overall effect is pretty perfect.  I found this recipe through David Lebovitz who came across the original recipe in the book Sister Pie: The Recipes and Stories of a Big-Hearted Bakery in Detroit by Lisa Ludwinski.

Since I’ve been baking for a million years and new things are what keep me going, I’m always on the hunt for new flavors.  Sometimes flavor combinations aren’t meant to be (I’m thinking of the holiday 2012 pink peppercorn and white chocolate sables…ew).  Others you think, ‘where have you been all my life?’  These smoked paprika and peanut butter cookies are definitely the latter.

P.S. Lest you feel bad for chocolate’s new rival, I dare you to make these, throw in some dark chocolate chunks and call it a threesome.

Peanut Butter Paprika Cookies

As seen on David Lebovitz’s blog and originated from  Sister Pie: The Recipes & Stories of a Big-Hearted Bakery in Detroit

Ingredients

For the paprika topping
1 TBS turbinado or raw granulated sugar
1 TBS granulated sugar
2 1/2 tsp smoked paprika
1 1/2 tsp flaky sea salt
Directions
  1. To make the cookie dough, in a medium bowl, whisk together the all-purpose and whole wheat flour with the baking powder, baking soda, 1 tsp kosher or salt, and 1/2 tsp smoked paprika.
  2. In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, or by hand, beat the butter, peanut butter, and the light brown and granulated sugar on medium speed until light and fluffy, about 3 minutes. Add the eggs one at a time, then the vanilla extract, stopping the mixer between adding each egg to scrape down the sides of the bowl.
  3. Stir in the dry ingredients until completely incorporated, making sure to scrape the bottom of the bowl, as you’ll likely find some unincorporated flour underneath the dough.
  4. Scrape the dough into a shallow bowl, cover, and refrigerate for at least 24 hours, or up to 3 days (TMH: I scraped everything into a gallon size freezer ziplock patted into rectangle–evenly distributed, the dough chills more quickly and evenly). (Dough can be frozen for up to three months–scoop into balls first.)
  5. Preheat the oven to 350ºF (180ºC.) Line two baking sheets with parchment paper or silicone baking mats.
  6. In a small bowl, mix together the turbinado and granulated sugar, paprika, and flaky sea salt.
  7. Scoop the dough into balls about (I like using a 1 1/2 TBS scooper). Roll each ball in the sugar and paprika mixture so it’s evenly coated, and place each on the baking sheet so they’re about 2 inches (5cm) apart.
  8. Bake the cookies, rotating the baking sheets in the oven midway during baking, until they are golden brown across the top, about 8-12 minutes. Remove from the oven and use a spatula to gently tap the tops of each cookie to flatten them slightly, which makes them more attractive, and chewy when cool.

Chocolate Licorice Brownie Cookies

Hey, hey, hey wait a second.  Give this a chance before you run away screaming.

Sometimes I feel as if I’ve made every cookie out there.  Were I enterprising, the next step would be to work out my own original recipes.  Alas, that will have to wait until my brain is less stuffed with other, more important things (eg whether our bathtub is big enough to keep a pet otter happy and, when I get a pet otter, what I will name it).

So, when I came across a recipe for salty black licorice brownie cookies by Charli Nowak over on Food 52, I was over on Amazon ordering ingredients before I’d even finished reading the article.

Now, I know what you are thinking–adding chocolate to black licorice is like putting lipstick on a pig.  But, stick with me. Something cool happens when you mix the earthy, herbal flavors of anise and licorice root with the smoky sweet flavors of deep dark chocolate.

I’ll admit, my own pump for licorice and chocolate were primed before I saw the recipe.  I’ve been thinking about creating an All Sorts French macaroon for a few months.  If you are a fan of these licorice candies paired with a host of flavors and stacked into colorful little blocks, you already know that chocolate and licorice are good friends.

These cookies are indulgent and immensely satisfying.  They’re deeply chocolate with enough je ne sais quoi to make them sophisticated and dare I say, sexy. Think Valentine’s Day worthy.

Still not convinced?  I’ve got you covered.

In the name of research, I offered up a couple to TD without mentioning the unusual ingredients.  TD is squarely in the no black jelly bean camp.

The verdict?  He was a big fan.

When I asked if he could identify the secret ingredients he guessed chocolate.

Did you know TD is the Latin abbreviation for Captain Obvious?

I ordered my licorice root powder and ground anise from Amazon in larger quantities because, as I mentioned, I have bigger plans for these flavors.  However, you should be able to find them at a spice shop like Penzy’s.  Or, if you live close and want to make these, let me know and I’ll share my stash.

Salty Black Licorice Brownie Cookies

adapted just a bit from Charli Nowak for Food 52

Ingredients

  • 7 ounces 60% dark chocolate chips
  • 2 TBS water
  • 2 tsp vanilla extract
  • stick (1/4 pound or 8 TBS) unsalted butter
  • large eggs, room temperature
  • 3/4 C granulated sugar
  • 1/2 C dark brown sugar, packed
  • 1 C all-purpose flour
  • 3 TBS black cocoa powder (or Dutch-processed cocoa powder)
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 2 TBS licorice root powder (available in specialty spice stores)
  • 2 tsp ground anise
  • 1/4 tsp kosher salt (plus more or flaky salt for sprinkling on top)
  • optional: 6 ounces mini chocolate chips or finely chopped dark chocolate bits optional

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 375° F. Line 4 large baking sheets with parchment paper or silicone baking mats.
  2. Place butter in a small pot over medium heat and begin melting. Cook for about 4 minutes, stirring frequently, until butter begins to brown and smell nutty. Immediately pour over chocolate mixture and stir until completely melted. Set aside.
  3. To the hot, melted butter, add chocolate, water, and vanilla extract.  Allow to sit for 5 minutes and then whisk until smooth.
  4. Place eggs and both sugars in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with a whisk attachment. Whip on high speed for 7 minutes until eggs are pale and ribbony.
  5. Sift together flour, cocoa powder, baking powder, licorice root power, anise, and salt. Set aside.
  6. Reduce mixer speed to low and slowly add melted chocolate mixture. Once combined, add dry ingredients and mix until just incorporated.
  7. Gently fold in chocolate chips
  8. Using your choice of scoop size (I used my favorite 1 1/2 TBS size, the original recipe called for a 3 TBS scoop), portion batter onto prepared trays leaving two inches between each. Sprinkle tops with flaky salt and bake until puffed and crackly, about 11 minutes. Remove from oven, give the tray a good smack against the counter, and let cool for at least 20 minutes.

Posession with intent to distribute

Sometimes I feel like a drug dealer when I deliver baked goods to friends and colleagues.  And, that’s not just because I like to lurk in dark alleyways and whisper, “hey kid, you wanna smoke some drugs?” out of the side of my mouth.

It’s also not the whole sugar is a drug thing (Yes, I know it is.  No, I’m not going to stop baking).

Maybe it’s because my hobby yields something people generally seem to want to consume. Then there is that part where people enjoy and then talk about why they shouldn’t have.  It may also have something to do with my ties to the Salamancas Family.   Anyhow on to the biggest baking drug deal of the year: 2018 Holiday Baking!

My analytics weren’t super awesome this year.  I just didn’t have time to work on data visualization. In their place,  I offer a summary:

  • 35 pounds of butter
  • 75 pounds of sugar
  • 25 pounds of fruits and nuts
  • 25 pounds of chocolate
  • 3500 units

And some old fashioned visuals.  You’ll find a  list of everything I baked with links at the bottom.

 

Holiday Baking 2018: The List

Candied Orange Peel

Candied Ginger

Triple Gingersnaps

World Peace Cookies

Sugar Cookies

Royal Icing (Sweet Sugarbelle)

Rum Butter Nuts

Peanut butter (schweddy) balls

Almond Butter Crunch

Cranberry White Chocolate Doodles (recipe isn’t quite ready for prime time)

 

 

When Pinterest gets ya

 

I’ll admit it, this is a Pinterest find.

It’s funny, for all the baking I do, I don’t spend very much time pursuing Pinterest for baking recipes.   Nope.  The vast majority of my Pinterest time is spent searching house blueprints.  And shoes.  And Vitamix recipes.  Even though I make the exact same protein smoothie every day.

But these I could not resist.  Oatmeal?  Butterscotch?  Yes please!

Now for a confession: I generally haven’t had much luck making oatmeal cookies.  It’s like I’m missing the oatmeal cookie gene.  Quick oats…regular oats…Irish oats…groats…doesn’t matter.  Instead of thick chewy wholesome treats, mine always spread.

So, using the skills I learned in baking class last summer I refrigerated the portioned-out dough over night.  My hope was that this would allow the oats to absorb some of the moisture while also chilling the butter to keep it from causing the dough to spread.

It worked pretty well.  I think there is still room from improvement (maybe smaller, thicker pucks of dough), but this is a delightful recipe with which to practice.

Chewy Butterscotch Oatmeal Cookies

adapted from Baker by Nature

Ingredients

  • 1 1/4 C all-purpose flour (measured properly/not packed)
  • 1/2 C *quick cooking oats (not instant)
  • 1/2 tsp cornstarch
  • 1/2 tsp baking powder
  • 3/4 tsp baking soda
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/2 tsp ground ginger
  • 1/8 tsp ground cloves
  • 1/2 C butter (4 ounces), at room temp
  • 3/4 C packed light brown sugar
  • 2 TBS granulated sugar
  • 2 TBSs (not blackstrap)
  • 3 large egg yolks at room temp
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1 C butterscotch chips

Directions

  1. In a large mixing bowl whisk together flour, oats, cornstarch, baking powder, baking soda, salt, cinnamon, ginger, and cloves; set aside.
  2. In the bowl of an electric stand mixer fit with the paddle attachment, whip the butter, sugars, and molasses on medium-high speed until light and fluffy; about 2 minutes.
  3. Add in egg yolks, one at a time, beating well after each addition.
  4. Mix in vanilla.
  5. Slowly add the dry ingredients into the wet mixture, beat on low until just combined; about 25 seconds.
  6. Fold in butterscotch chips.
  7. Using spoons or a scoop, portion out the dough into individual balls or half domes.  Arrange on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper, cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate over night.
  8. When ready to bake, preheat oven to 350 degrees (F). Line 2 large baking sheets with parchment paper or silicon baking mats.
  9. Using the flat bottom of a cup or mug, gently flatten each ball to between 1/4 and 1/8 inch disks (you may need to dip the glass or mug in sugar to keep the dough from sticking.
  10. Bake in preheated oven for 9 minutes, or until set at the edges but still slightly jiggly in the center.
  11. Allow cookies to cool 5 minutes on the baking sheet before transferring to wire rack to cool completely.

Roasted Strawberries and Cream Cookies

If you haven’t noticed, I kind of have a thing for roasted strawberries:  Exhibit A and  Exhibit B.

So, it shouldn’t come as a surprise that my little baking brain wondered if replacing the dried blueberries with roasted strawberries in Christina Tosi’s blueberries and cream cookies recipe would make a good swap.  Why roasted instead of dried strawberries?  Because up until about five minutes ago when I checked out Amazon, I didn’t know dried strawberries existed.

Knowledge may be power, but necessity is the mother of invention.  And I needed to make these cookies.  I also needed to stop quoting cliches.

Many of Christina Tosi’s recipes pay homage to her middle-class upbringing.  Without realizing it, I stumbled into a nostalgic favorite of my own.  I’m pretty sure I ate the same thing for breakfast every morning during middle school: Quaker strawberries and cream oatmeal.  As I bit into one of these cookies I was suddenly back in the seventh grade wearing my favorite two-tone Guess jeans and shaker knit sweater from Express wondering if I could talk my mom into carpooling to the mall that weekend.

Oh the responsibilities of being 12 in suburbia.

Anyhow, as summer is right around the corner, it would be pretty fun to make a batch of the original and a batch of the strawberry version of this recipe for your Fourth of July celebrations.

Strawberries and Cream Cookies

adapted from Christina Tosi’s blueberries and cream cookies

for the  streusel

Ingredients

  • 3/4 cup nonfat dry milk powder
  • 1/2 cup all purpose flour
  • 3 tablespoons sugar
  • 2 tablespoons cornstarch
  • 3/4 teaspoon coarse kosher salt
  • 6 tablespoons (3/4 stick) unsalted butter, melted
  • 4 ounces chopped white chocolate

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 275°F. Line large rimmed baking sheet with parchment.
  2. Combine milk powder, flour, sugar, cornstarch, and coarse salt in medium bowl; toss to mix evenly.
  3. Add butter; stir with fork until clusters form. Spread mixture evenly on prepared sheet.
  4. Bake until crumbs are dry and crumbly but still pale, about 10 minutes.
  5. Cool Milk Crumbs completely on sheet.
  6. In a double boiler or microwave, melt white chocolate.  Pour over milk crumbs and toss with a fork until coated.
  7. Continue to toss with a fork every few minutes until the crumbs are dry.
  8. DO AHEAD Can be made 1 week ahead. Store in airtight container at room temperature.

for the roasted strawberries

Ingredients

  • 2 C fresh strawberries

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Gently wash and cut strawberries into quarters.
  2. Place berries on a cooling rack fitted into a baking sheet, seeds-side-down (note, you can skip the cooling rack and place directly on parchment but will need to turn the berries halfway through baking).
  3. Bake until strawberries are partially dried, about 45 minutes. Let cool.

for the cookies

Ingredients

Ingredients

  • 2 cups (4 sticks) unsalted butter, room temperature
  • 1 1/2 cups sugar
  • 1 1/2 cups plus 2 tablespoons (packed) golden brown sugar
  • 1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons glucose or light corn syrup
  • 2 large eggs
  • 5 1/4 cups all purpose flour
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon coarse kosher salt
  • 1 1/2 cups struesel
  • Roasted strawberries

Directions

  1. Combine butter, both sugars, and corn syrup in large bowl of stand mixer fitted with paddle attachment. Beat on medium-high speed until fluffy and pale, occasionally scraping down sides of bowl, about 3 minutes.
  2. Add eggs; beat on medium-high speed until mixture is very pale and sugar is completely dissolved, about 10 minutes.
  3. Add flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt; beat on low speed just until blended, occasionally scraping down sides of bowl.
  4. Add streusel; mix on low speed just until incorporated. Remove bowl from mixer. Stir in strawberries just until evenly distributed (dough will be very sticky).
  5. Using 1/4-cup ice cream scoop for each cookie (I actually used a smaller scoop–1/4 cup scoops make huge cookies), drop dough onto 2 large rimmed baking sheets.
  6. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate at least 24 hours.
  7. While dough is cold, flatten the domes into disks using the flat-edged bottom of a cup or glass.  To prevent sticking, dip the glass in granulated sugar before flattening each dome.
  8. Position 1 rack in top third and 1 rack in bottom third of oven and preheat to 375°F.
  9. Line 2 large (18×12-inch) rimmed baking sheets with parchment. Transfer 6 chilled dough scoops (more if you’ve used a smaller scoop) to each sheet, spacing at least 4 inches apart (cookies will spread).
  10. Bake cookies, 2 sheets at a time, until golden, reversing sheets halfway through baking, 20 to 22 minutes total (smaller cookies cook in about 12 minutes–start checking at 10).
  11. Repeat with remaining chilled dough, cooling and relining sheets between batches.
  12. Transfer cookies to racks; cool completely.